If Time Doesn't Exist For Photons, How Does Anything Happen To It?

Images showing the expansion of the light echo of V838 Monocerotis. Image credit: NASA, ESA, H.E. Bond (STScI) and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

Images showing the expansion of the light echo of V838 Monocerotis. Image credit: NASA, ESA, H.E. Bond (STScI) and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

The concept of photons running with stopped clocks is something that is pulled straight out of relativity; the faster you’re moving, the slower your onboard clocks are moving...

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Would A White Dwarf Outlive A Neutron Star?

This multiwavelength composite shows the supernova remnant IC 443, also known as the Jellyfish Nebula. Fermi GeV gamma-ray emission is shown in magenta, optical wavelengths as yellow, and infrared data from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission is shown as blue (3.4 microns), cyan (4.6 microns), green (12 microns) and red (22 microns). Image credit: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration, Tom Bash and John Fox/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF, JPL-Caltech/UCLA

This multiwavelength composite shows the supernova remnant IC 443, also known as the Jellyfish Nebula. Fermi GeV gamma-ray emission is shown in magenta, optical wavelengths as yellow, and infrared data from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission is shown as blue (3.4 microns), cyan (4.6 microns), green (12 microns) and red (22 microns). Image credit: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration, Tom Bash and John Fox/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF, JPL-Caltech/UCLA

This is an interesting question, because most of the time when we talk about the lifetime of a star, we mean the part before the creation of a white dwarf or a neutron star.  Typically, a star has a “lifetime”...

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Why Does The Moon Rise Later Each Day?

Why does the Moon rise 30 to 70 mins later each day than the previous day?
The Galileo spacecraft took this 1992 shot showing the Moon in orbit about Earth. With only a third of the brightness of Earth, the Moon has been digitally enhanced to improve visibility. Image credit: NASA

The Galileo spacecraft took this 1992 shot showing the Moon in orbit about Earth. With only a third of the brightness of Earth, the Moon has been digitally enhanced to improve visibility. Image credit: NASA

The Moon does indeed rise on average 50 minutes later each day in our skies, which may come as a surprisingly large daily change, particularly if you’re used to the much more gradual changes of sunrise...

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Why Are Earth And Venus Called Twins?

Why are Earth and Venus called twins?
This global view of the surface of Venus is centered at 180 degrees east longitude. Magellan synthetic aperture radar mosaics from the first cycle of Magellan mapping are mapped onto a computer-simulated globe to create this image. Image credit: NASA/JPL

This global view of the surface of Venus is centered at 180 degrees east longitude. Magellan synthetic aperture radar mosaics from the first cycle of Magellan mapping are mapped onto a computer-simulated globe to create this image. Image credit: NASA/JPL

The Earth and Venus do often get called planetary twins, and this is largely because they are very close to being the same mass. Both the Earth and Venus are rocky...

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