How Far South Could You See The Aurora With A Perfect Solar Storm?

How far south/north could the Auroras be seen if the atmospheric conditions were perfect and the earth was hit with the perfect solar storm and would there be other effects?
ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst took this image of an aurora as he circled Earth on the International Space Station. Aurora occur when electrons from the Sun hit Earth's atmosphere. Auroras occur frequently over both the North and South polar regions, but are often difficult to see from populated areas. Alexander is a member of the International Space Station Expedition 40/41 crew. He spent five and a half months living and working on the Station for his Blue Dot mission. Image Credit: ESA/NASA

ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst took this image of an aurora as he circled Earth on the International Space Station. Aurora occur when electrons from the Sun hit Earth's atmosphere. Auroras occur frequently over both the North and South polar regions, but are often difficult to see from populated areas. Alexander is a member of the International Space Station Expedition 40/41 crew. He spent five and a half months living and working on the Station for his Blue Dot mission. Image Credit: ESA/NASA

We have a pretty good template for this one, actually, because the Earth was hit with a very powerful solar storm in 1859. The solar flare that started it off was observed by Richard Carrington, who had a history of sunspot-watching...

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