How Do We Track Photons Through Space?

When a particle moves through spacetime, how do we know it is the same particle and not some excitation that is passed from place to place?
Wispy tendrils of hot dust and gas glow brightly in this ultraviolet image of the Cygnus Loop Nebula, taken by NASA’s Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The nebula lies about 1,500 light-years away, and is a supernova remnant, left over from a massive stellar explosion that occurred 5,000-8,000 years ago. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Wispy tendrils of hot dust and gas glow brightly in this ultraviolet image of the Cygnus Loop Nebula, taken by NASA’s Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The nebula lies about 1,500 light-years away, and is a supernova remnant, left over from a massive stellar explosion that occurred 5,000-8,000 years ago. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

We don’t! This is a really interesting feature of our universe, and it comes from the observation that all subatomic particles are described by a few key properties, but are otherwise completely and utterly...

Read the full article on Forbes!

Remember to vote for Astroquizzical, which has been nominated for Canada's top 12 favorite science blogs!

Have your own question? Feel free to ask! Or submit your questions via the sidebarFacebook, or twitter.

Sign up for the mailing list for updates & news straight to your inbox!