Why Didn't 'Oumuamua Hit The Sun?

If Oumuamua has come from so far away, and in it’s final approach was primarily attracted by the Sun, why didn’t it hit the Sun? Were the gravitational forces of other planets sufficient to make it miss?
This artist’s impression shows the first interstellar asteroid: `Oumuamua. This unique object was discovered on 19 October 2017 by the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope in Hawai`i. Subsequent observations from ESO’s Very Large Telescope in Chile and other observatories around the world show that it was traveling through space for millions of years before its chance encounter with our star system. Image credit: European Southern Observatory/M. Kornmesser

This artist’s impression shows the first interstellar asteroid: `Oumuamua. This unique object was discovered on 19 October 2017 by the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope in Hawai`i. Subsequent observations from ESO’s Very Large Telescope in Chile and other observatories around the world show that it was traveling through space for millions of years before its chance encounter with our star system. Image credit: European Southern Observatory/M. Kornmesser

The answer to this question lies in how gravity acts over large distances, with a bit of interstellar aiming thrown in for flavor.

On the surface of planet Earth, the force of gravity is pretty much a constant through our entire lives. We recognize it as the influence which grounds us to the surface of our planet - but it remains a constant feature...

Read the full article on Forbes!

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