Would You Notice If An Atom Of Anti-Hydrogen Annihilated In Your Room?

If an atom of anti-hydrogen came into existence in the room you are in, would you notice?
One of the first lead-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, recorded by the ALICE detector in November 2010. In this collision of lead nuclei at a small impact parameter (central collision), 1209 positively-charged (darker tracks) and 1197 negatively-charged (lighter tracks) particles are produced. Image credit:  CERN, for the benefit of the ALICE Collaboration (License: CC-BY-4.0)

One of the first lead-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, recorded by the ALICE detector in November 2010. In this collision of lead nuclei at a small impact parameter (central collision), 1209 positively-charged (darker tracks) and 1197 negatively-charged (lighter tracks) particles are produced. Image credit:  CERN, for the benefit of the ALICE Collaboration (License: CC-BY-4.0)

Anti-hydrogen is the antimatter equivalent of the hydrogen atom. The simplest atom in our Universe, hydrogen is usually made of a single proton and a single electron. Hydrogen is also one of the most abundant elements in our Universe by a large margin, but its antimatter counterpart has been rather difficult...

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